Body of Knowledge

  • Thought Food

    The secret to scientific discoveries? Making mistakes.

    - by ted.com

    Phil Plait was on a Hubble Space Telescope team of astronomers who thought they may have captured the first direct photo of an exoplanet ever taken. But did the evidence actually support that? Follow along as Plait shows how science progresses — through a robust amount of making and correcting errors. “The price of doing science is admitting when you’re wrong, but the payoff is the best there is: knowledge and understanding,” he says. Watch the video

  • Thought Food

    Should the world worry about America’s corporate debt mountain?

    - by Economist.com

    Should the rest of the world look again at America regarding Household debt? Seeing that it has been shrinking relative to the economy ever since it scuppered the financial system… However, since 2012, corporate debt has been doing the opposite. According to the Federal Reserve, the ratio of non-financial business debt to GDP has grown by eight percentage points in the past seven years, about the same amount as household debt has shrunk. It is now at a record high, thus this topic needs to be re-assessed. Read more

  • Thought Food

    The wave of unicorn IPOs reveals Silicon Valley’s groupthink

    - by Economist.com

    The Economist suggest that if you want to go unicorn spotting, you must not hesitate to take a turn around the brand-new park on top of San Francisco’s Transbay bus terminal. This is not because it is perched on a spectacular, undulating building that itself looks quite like a mythical beast to the likes of Moby Dick, nor because its tastefully planted flora offer a particularly enticing equine habitat. It is just that, as a would-be icon of San Francisco’s business district, the park is conveniently placed for looking out on their corporate headquarters… Read more

  • Thought Food

    Why Legacy Companies Must Reinvent—or Die

    - by Gretchen Lubbe

    Fortune poses the question: So, who’s winning? The disruptors or the incumbents? This article means that while incumbents often get a bad rap, the truth is that for every sector where technological change has enabled fleet-footed digital disruptors to innovate business models, there are even more where established players still prevail. Furthermore the reader is here persuaded to think artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, blockchain – because it is believed that many incumbents stand a good chance of prevailing yet again, provided they move fast and at scale… Read more

  • Body of Knowledge

    The Agile Mind: Scientific Thinking

    - by Jonathan Escobar

    Agile neither fears nor worships failure. For some time, I’ve been noticing a trend. At conferences, in business schools, in business books and “business cartoons”: a trend that trivializes failure. The alarming equation I see set forth everywhere is: This newfound glorification of failure triggers the same mixture of alarm and sadness from another earlier extreme, before ‘failing forward’ rose to aspirational heights. In earlier times, the equation was: Two extremes. This previous obsession with failure avoidance produced a generation of steadfast fighters for the preservation of status quo surrounded by a dense layer of opacity around problems (aka opportunities).…

  • Body of Knowledge

    Leading the Agile Organization

    - by Frederick Fladmark

    “62% of leaders we surveyed didn’t want to lead, but incentives lead them to take a promotion” Michael C. Bush This is a quote from Michael C. Bush, who recently took part on the HBR Webinar “Leading the Agile Organization”. I thought this was a really interesting insight, and very telling. In my perception if you want to create an agile organisation (ie nimble not Agile©) you need great leaders. If a person doesn’t want lead, they are going to struggle to execute the leadership needed to thrive in a complex and changing environment. The webinar hosted a pretty interesting…

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